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Teaching Black History in the 21st century

The very moment a child is exposed to their own history, a world of possibilities presents itself. It is essentially, the knowledge of one’s past that paves the way for one’s future. While there’s no doubt that the historical footprint of African Americans within these United States has been marred with pain, degradation and injustice. Notably however, there is also a footprint overflowing with accomplishment, triumph, strength, and value, reaching back from before Jamestown 1619 through to this present day.

Through our black history presentations, educational programs and lectures, Grandmothers Who Help is determined to replace the barrage of negative images pressed upon black youth in almost every aspect of today’s society, and the lack of inclusion within US History lessons taught throughout schools across this nation.  We work with teachers, librarians, churches and community organizations to create an experience that for one child builds pride and for another creates bridges of understanding.

We are determined not only to use black history as lessons of the past, but also as a resource to connect to the future.   Our presentations bring full exposure to current and historical figures who make up a long lineage of scientist, educators, politicians, civil rights leaders, musicians, inventors, doctors, domestic workers, and entrepreneurs. Those whose contributions are not only woven within the fabric of these United States, but also played one of the most important roles in helping the United Stated of America become the economic powerhouse it is today.

Knowledge is power, and by opening up [their own] history to a black child, we are building in them self-awareness, pride and the permission to dream…to dream big! 

 

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How do we as a community stay on top of these issues to make sure the ball keeps rolling. Lets create a dialogue-Email us your comments let our voices continue to be heard Info@grandmotherswhohelp.com.



https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/derek-chauvin...

Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murder in George Floyd's death. A guilty verdict on all three charges was reached against the former Minneapolis police officer.


What happens next? https://www.fox5atlanta.com/news/derek-chauvin-verdict-what-happens-next-3-other-officers-charged-in-george-floyd-death-to-be-tried. The other three police officers charged with aiding and abetting in connection with Floyd’s death will be tried together this summer.


The announcement of the civil investigation comes one day after the jury convicted Chauvin of murdering Floyd. Chauvin was found guilty on all three counts: second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Jim Crow 2021 - Bing News 'The New Jim Crow': Republicans and Democrats at odds over voting rights.

SF Mayor: 'This verdict does not bring back the life of George Floyd' (msn.com)... "This verdict does not bring back the life of George Floyd," said San Francisco Mayor London Breed. "What this verdict does reflect is that the tide is turning in this country, although still too slowly, toward accountability and justice." Mayor Breed also brought up the program Opportunities For All offering paid internships for all high school students in San Francisco. Mayor Breed says it has everything to do with addressing disparities with investments that will change the outcomes for people - especially people who are African American. RELATED: San Francisco launches street crisis team to respond to 911 mental health, addiction calls

 

On May 25, 2020, George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was killed in Minneapolis, Minnesota, during an arrest for allegedly using a counterfeit billDerek Chauvin, a white police officer, knelt on Floyd's neck for almost nine minutes while Floyd was handcuffed and lying face down, begging for his life and repeatedly saying "I can't breathe"  

  Floyd's death triggered demonstrations and protests in many U.S. cities and around the world against police brutality, police racism, and lack of police accountability.  

George Floyd’s brother Philonise Floyd said the former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin's legal defense team is “trying to assassinate" his brother's character.

“He's fighting for his life, just like I'm fighting for my brother's life. We have seen the video. We have facts. They are in there trying to assassinate his character. When you don't have facts, that's what you have to do,” he told CNN.

Describing the first day of Chauvin’s trial as an “emotional roller coaster,” Floyd said he didn’t know that the former police officer knelt on his brother for nine minutes and 29 seconds.

The video, every time I watched it, I only just hear eight minutes and 46 seconds. I never try to watch the entire video. It's not something that you want to watch — your brother tortured and screaming and asking for our mom and saying ‘tell my kids I love them. I can't breathe.’”

He added:

“To everybody else, it was a case and a cause. To me, it was my brother. Somebody that I grew up with — eating with, sleeping in the same bed with, going fishing with. Just watching him dance with my mother. Those are the things that I think about when I think about my brother. He was a protector. He was someone who we can go to when we were in trouble and in need of anything,” he said Tuesday.

WATCH:

Derek Chauvin is on trial for George Floyd's death

By Melissa Macaya, Mike Hayes, Meg WagnerMelissa Mahtani and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 7:14 PM ET, Tue March 30, 2021

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Image by James Eades

Downtown Oakland Mural

Black lives matter sign